Appointment Request

Dr. Ivan Jin

Dr. Ivan Jin has not set their biography yet

Posted by on in News & Articles

b2ap3_thumbnail_get-kids-to-brush-teeth.jpg

Parents of small children definitely get the same old tantrums and tears when it’s time for them to brush their teeth. It may seem almost impossible to get them to cooperate, with all the thrashing, screaming, and crying getting in the way of helping your kids maintain proper dental hygiene habits. There is no easy road to success here. Children just don’t have the capability to understand this importance yet and it is totally normal. Still, here are a few ways you can help incite your kids to brush their teeth.

Consider skipping on the toothpaste:

Many children don’t like to brush because the toothpaste they use has a weird texture, makes them gag, or simply tastes “funny”. At a young age, it is completely fine to have them brush with just water. This is one way to see if your kids are open to the idea of brushing and eventually you can try and reintroduce them to toothpaste in the future. The other option is to buy toothpaste that is specifically designed for kids, such as ones that are okay to swallow in small amounts, just in case.

Become a dinosaur:

You read it right. A great way to get your kids to brush their teeth is making the experience a fun and exciting game for them. Encourage them to say “grrrrr” to show the front teeth, and “ahhhhh” to show the back. Having your child roar like a large extinct reptile not only puts them at ease but also helps them open their mouth wide while brushing to get every nook and cranny.

Play copycat:

Children have an innate desire to mimic everything they see, so why not show them something that they should follow: like maybe you brushing your own teeth. This is a slightly more sneaky approach. While you’re brushing in front of your child, make sure their toothbrush is just within reach. Adding faces and sounds of excitement while brushing definitely wouldn’t hurt and it will make it more likely that your child will pick up their toothbrush and follow in the fun.

...

Posted by on in News & Articles

b2ap3_thumbnail_good-oral-health.jpg

Your child's dental development starts extremely early in life. As they age and change, so will the strategies for helping them take care of their teeth.

At 0-2 years, the teething process is already underway. At 0-6 months, the front teeth begin to emerge, often in pairs. The lower teeth usually arrive sooner than the upper ones. At this time it is recommended to give sugary liquids like milk and juice as little exposure as possible to your baby's gums, as it can cause decay. At 7-12 months, your baby's incisors (front teeth) start pushing past the gums while the permanent teeth begin to develop underneath. Depending on the child, he or she may experience a range of discomfort as the new teeth emerge. Heavy drooling, swelling, and trouble eating or sleeping are common occurences but if any symptoms persist, check with your pediatrician about teething medication or pain relievers. Finally, at 13-24 months, the molars start to appear as well. At this time it is okay to start brushing with a soft toothbrush (no toothpaste required) and if teeth appear in twos next to each other flossing is also a good thing to do. From 20 months onward, using toothpaste should be taught to your child. Just make sure they spit it out!

At 3-4 years old, the roots of your child's teeth will begin to disappear and this will make room for the eventual permanent teeth. This age range is also characterized as your child's first dental visit. It is important you encourage your child to brush his or her teeth twice a day with a pea-sized amount of toothpaste as well as after snacking, especially on more sugary foods. Also, if your child is still sucking on their thumb, now would be a good time to stop since it can lead to problems in the future like crooked teeth.

The golden age of 6 is when your child's first permanent teeth begin to push their way past the gums. Where they sprout out first can vary but usually they are first seen in the lower front teeth or in the molars. The period when there is a combination of primary (baby) teeth and permanent teeth in the mouth is called "mixed dentition". Since teeth are especially prone to decay at this time, fluoride supplements or dental sealants are recommended. Be wary of your child if he or she has an active lifestyle because tooth-related injuries are extremely common. Lastly, this is also the time to perhaps mention the existence of the tooth fairy and the tooth and pillow ritual that goes along with that.

...

Posted by on in Uncategorized

dental cavities.png

A new study has concluded that people who develop more dental cavities in their lives have a significantly lower risk of being diagnosed with head and neck cancer when compared to people who develop few or no cavities.

Dental cavities are caused when bacteria present in the mouth creates lactic acids that strip crucial minerals from the tooth, causing tooth decay. Apparently the bacteria that causes tooth decay may in fact be linked with a specific immune response that may be protective against Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC).

In order to test this theory, a new study was implemented involving about 400 people newly diagnosed with HSNCC and about 250 people without any cancer. Each subject's dental history involving cavities was analyzed through observing how many of their teeth had been decayed, missing, or had been filled at a dentist. The study concluded that the people with high cavity numbers were less likely to have or develop HSNCC compared with participants with low cavity numbers.

This makes a strange case for the actual health benefits of having the bacteria responsible for tooth decay present in one's mouth. In other words, when attempting to prevent cancer, cavities may be seen as a form of "collateral damage". However, new strategies are slowly being implemented to reduce the risk of dental cavities while still preserving the benefits of the lactic acid bacteria that causes them in the first place.

...
Tagged in: cavities cancer

b2ap3_thumbnail_kolibree-toothbrush.png

The days of constantly nagging your kids or spouse to brush their teeth regularly have perhaps come to an end. A new company from France has introduced what is probably known as the first wirelessly connected electric toothbrush. The brush is paired with an app that can be downloaded on almost any device and syncs wirelessly to it in order to give you updates on the brushing habits of you or your kids.

Unveiled last week at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, the Kolibree toothbrush looks to be the next big step towards a "brighter" future (with smiles, of course). 

As the brush is being used, it grades the efficiency of your brushing habits and even rewards you for a job well done. At one's discretion, the app can also be linked to social networking sites like Facebook and even your Kensington Square Dental to show Dr. Jin just how well (or badly) you are keeping up with your daily brushing routine.

Depending on which model, the Kolibree brush will cost about $99 to $200 and will become available for pre-order online starting this summer. The device itself does not have any new features that improve brushing, however, the point is to create more of an incentive for people to brush more effectively and more frequently than with a regular electric toothbrush. The incentive is created by making brushing into a sort of game which gives points depending on 1) how long you brush, 2) whether you have brushed in all four quadrants of your mouth, and 3) if you have brushed everywhere both up to down and side to side.

...

Posted by on in Uncategorized

Dental Clinic in North Surrey BC

the-dental-group-logoSurrey British Columbia is the fasting growing city in the province.  It's also British Columbia's second-largest city by population after the city of Vancouver.

Welcome to Surrey's newest dental clinic.  Led by veteran dentist Dr. Maru and his team of exceptional new dentists, The Dental Group at Central City caters to the busy traffic at Central City Shopping Mall.  Dental patients includes both young and old, working class and students! 

Website: www.thedentalgroupatcentralcity.com/
Address:112-1117 Central City Shopping Centre Surrey V3T 2W1

King George Highway Dental Clinic

the-dental-group-logoSurrey Place Dental Clinic in North Surrey along the King George Highway is one of the oldest dental clinics in Surrey BC.  At Surrey Place Dental they pride themselves on patient-dentist relationship. Working to understand what the patients want is the number one priority.  Just because the patients tell us something doesn't necessary mean that's what they want.  So building a healthy relationship with our patients help us to understand the problem so we can find the right solution.

Website: http://surreyplacedental.com
Address: 2446 Central City Surrey V3T 2W1

...

Latest News

Burnaby Dental Proud Sponsor
Kensington Square Dental is proud to be a sponsor of Hastings Community Little league for 2013. Hastings Community Little League (HCLL) is a non-profit sports organization which provides  high...
Continue Reading...
Dental mission to Bhutan
Since they were dental students, both dentists Dr. Jin and Dr. Wong have been actively involved in volunteering their time in various developing countries. They have recently returned from Bhartsam,...
Continue Reading...

Kensington Square Dental Centre

map of dental clinic in burnaby

6562 Hastings Street Burnaby BC, V5B 1S2
Phone: 604.298.5595
info@kensingtonsquaredental.com

Hours of Operation:

Monday 10:00 - 7:00 pm
Tuesday 10:00 - 6:00 pm
Wednesday 10:00 - 7:00 pm
Thursday 9:00 - 5:00 pm
Friday 8:00 - 5:00 pm
Saturday By Appointment
Sunday Closed

 

Video Tour

Meet Doctors Ivan Jin and Grace Wong and hear what patients have to say about Kensington Square Dental Centre.

We're on facebook